Authentication

Authentication through Doctrine is fully supported by DoctrineModule through an authentication adapter, and a specific storage implementation that relies on the database. Most of the time, those classes will be used in conjunction with Laminas\Authentication\AuthenticationService class.

Simple example

In order to authenticate a user (or anything else) against Doctrine, the following workflow is used:

  1. Set configuration that contains options about the entity that is authenticated (credential property, identity property…). It is not necessary to create a separate authentication adapter, this will be automatically created by the DoctrineModule based on the defined configuration.
  2. Create a storage adapter. If the authentication succeeds, the identifier of the entity will be automatically stored in session.
  3. Create a Laminas\Authentication\AuthenticationService instance that contains both the authentication adapter and the storage adapter.

Authentication factory

To make your life easier, DoctrineModule provides an Authentication factory through the DoctrineModule\Options\Authentication class.

The first task is to configure the Authentication by adding the authentication key to the doctrine key in your config file (we assume here that the entity we want to authentication is simply called Application\Entity\User):

1// in your module.config.php: return [ 'doctrine' => [ 'authentication' => [ 'orm_default' => [ 'object_manager' => 'Doctrine\ORM\EntityManager', 'identity_class' => 'Application\Entity\User', 'identity_property' => 'email', 'credential_property' => 'password', ], ], ], ];
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Here are some explanations about the keys:

  • the object_manager key can either be a concrete instance of a Doctrine\Persistence\ObjectManager or a single string that will fetched from the Service Manager in order to get a concrete instance. If you are using DoctrineORMModule, you can simply write Doctrine\ORM\EntityManager (as the EntityManager implements the class Doctrine\Persistence\ObjectManager).
  • the identity_class contains the FQCN of the entity that will be used during the authentication process.
  • the identity_property contains the name of the property that will be used as the identity property (most often, this is email, username…). Please note that we are talking here of the PROPERTY, not the table column name (although it can be the same in most of the cases).
  • the credential_property contains the name of the property that will be used as the credential property (most often, this is password…).

The authentication accept some more options that can be used :

  • the object_repository can be used instead of the object_manager key. Most of the time you won’t deal with the one, as specifying the identity_class name will automatically fetch the object_repository for you.
  • the credential_callable is a very useful option that allow you to perform some custom logic when checking if the credential is correct. For instance, if your password are encrypted using Bcrypt algorithm, you will need to perform specific logic. This option can be any callable function (closure, class method…). This function will be given the complete entity fetched from the database, and the credential that was given by the user during the authentication process.

Here is an example code that adds the credential_callable function to our previous example :

1// in your module.config.php: return [ 'doctrine' => [ 'authentication' => [ 'orm_default' => [ 'object_manager' => 'Doctrine\ORM\EntityManager', 'identity_class' => 'Application\Entity\User', 'identity_property' => 'email', 'credential_property' => 'password', 'credential_callable' => function (User $user, $passwordGiven) { return my_awesome_check_test($user->getPassword(), $passwordGiven); }, ], ], ], ];
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Here is another example that uses a controller method as the credential_callable callback. Note that the controller method must be declared public static.

1// in your module.config.php: return [ 'doctrine' => [ 'authentication' => [ 'orm_default' => [ 'object_manager' => 'Doctrine\ORM\EntityManager', 'identity_class' => 'Application\Entity\User', 'identity_property' => 'email', 'credential_property' => 'password', 'credential_callable' => 'Application\Controller\UserController::verifyCredential' ], ], ], ]; // in UserController.php public static function verifyCredential(User $user, $inputPassword) { return password_verify($inputPassword, $user->getPassword()); }
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Creating the AuthenticationService

Now that we have configured the authentication, we still need to tell Laminas how to construct a correct Laminas\Authentication\AuthenticationService instance. For this, add the following code in your Module.php class:

1namespace Application; use Laminas\Authentication\AuthenticationService; class Module { public function getServiceConfig() { return [ 'factories' => [ 'Laminas\Authentication\AuthenticationService' => function ($serviceManager) { // If you are using DoctrineORMModule: return $serviceManager->get('doctrine.authenticationservice.orm_default'); // If you are using DoctrineODMModule: return $serviceManager->get('doctrine.authenticationservice.odm_default'); }, ], ]; } }
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Please note that I am using here a Laminas\Authentication\AuthenticationService name, but it can be anything else (my_auth_service …). However, using the name Laminas\Authentication\AuthenticationService will allow it to be recognised by the Laminas Identity view helper.

In Laminas, you can inject the Laminas\Authentication\AuthenticationService into your controller factories as in the example below:

1<?php namespace Application\Factory\Controller; use Interop\Container\ContainerInterface; use Laminas\ServiceManager\Factory\FactoryInterface; class ApplicationControllerFactory implements FactoryInterface { public function __invoke(ContainerInterface $container, $requestedName, array $options = null) { $authenticationService = $container->get('doctrine.authenticationservice.orm_default'); return new $requestedName($authenticationService); } }
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Using the AuthenticationService

Now that we have defined how to create a Laminas\Authentication\AuthenticationService object we can use it in our code. For more information about Laminas authentication mechanisms please read the laminas-authentication documentation.

Here is an example of how we could use it from a controller action (we stripped any Form things for simplicity):

1public function loginAction() { $data = $this->getRequest()->getPost(); // If you used another name for the authentication service, change it here $authService = $this->getServiceLocator()->get('Laminas\Authentication\AuthenticationService'); $adapter = $authService->getAdapter(); $adapter->setIdentityValue($data['login']); $adapter->setCredentialValue($data['password']); $authResult = $authService->authenticate(); if ($authResult->isValid()) { return $this->redirect()->toRoute('home'); } return new ViewModel([ 'error' => 'Your authentication credentials are not valid', ]); }
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Instead of Zend Framework 2, you can do like this in Zend Framework 3 and Laminas:

1public function __construct(AuthenticationService $authenticationService) { $this->authenticationService = $authenticationService; } public function loginAction() { $data = $this->getRequest()->getPost(); $adapter = $this->authenticationService->getAdapter(); $adapter->setIdentity($data['login']); $adapter->setCredential($data['password']); $authResult = $this->authenticationService->authenticate(); if ($authResult->isValid()) { return $this->redirect()->toRoute('home'); } return new ViewModel([ 'error' => 'Your authentication credentials are not valid', ]); }
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Of course, doing this in the controller is not the best practice, and you’d better move that kind of logic to a service layer. But this is how it works.

Note that when the authentication is valid, we first get the identity :

1$identity = $authenticationResult->getIdentity();

This will return the full entity (in our case, an Application\Entity\User instance). However, storing a full entity in session is not a recommended practice. That’s why, when writing the identity :

1$authService->getStorage()->write($identity);

The storage automatically extracts ONLY the identifier values and only store this in session (this avoid to store in session a serialized entity, which is a bad practice). Later, when you want to retrieve the logged user :

1$authenticationService = $services->get('Laminas\Authentication\AuthenticationService'); $authenticatedUser = $authenticationService->getIdentity();
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The authentication storage will automatically handle the conversion from saved data to managed entity and the opposite. It will avoid serializing entities since that is a strongly discouraged practice.

View helper and controller helper

You may also need to know if there is an authenticated user within your other controllers or in views. Laminas provides a controller plugin and a view helper you may use.

Here is how you use it in your controller :

1public function testAction() { if ($user = $this->identity()) { // someone is logged ! } else { // not logged in } }
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And in your view :

1<?php if ($user = $this->identity()) { echo 'Logged in as ' . $this->escapeHtml($user->getUsername()); } else { echo 'Not logged in'; } ?>
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